Replace That Old Dingy Breadboard — The Hardware Hut
Woodfold Breadboard Alder
Woodfold Breadboard Alder

Replace That Old Dingy Breadboard

The last place I lived, we had a very used breadboard in the kitchen…like, very, very used. I think it was original to the house, which was built somewhere during the 50s’. Lucky for me, I work at a hardware store and know just how easy it is to replace for a newer, cleaner, and better product. And now you will, too.

The First Go-To

Woodfold Breadboard Alder

Here at TheHardwareHut.com, we carry a solid hardwood Alder breadboard by Woodfold in three widths: 16″, 18″, and 24″. They are all 22″ long and 3/4″ thick. The nifty thing about ours is that there is a finger pull on both ends, with two different wood species so you can decide which fits best with your cabinets. One end is Alder, and the other end is Oak. Woodfold applies an FDA-approved sealant to the permanently laminated breadboard. This helps resist moisture penetration.

The nice thing is after one side gets worn from knife marks and food stains, you can flip it over and use the other side. If your current breadboard (or, empty space where your breadboard should be) isn’t one of the three widths we offer, it’s an easy fix. Order the size up and cut it for a perfect fit. Don’t have a saw? Neither did I, since I live in an apartment. I simply brought it over to my parents’ house to have my dad cut it while Mom and I talked about their upcoming vacation.

Epco Breadboard ScrewAd-On Screws & Slides

If you’d rather your breadboard be flush with the front of the cabinet, you can install a knob on the breadboard edge. This will allow you to pull the board out of the opening. We carry a few mini knobs with wood screw ends. These knobs can easily be installed directly to the head of the breadboard. We also have a combo screw that is #8-32 on one end and a wood screw on the other end. That way, you can affix any cabinet knob you want that works with the #8-32 screw.

Woodfold Breadboard SlidesMaybe you’re lucky enough to be putting together a brand new cabinet. If that’s the case and you want to include a breadboard, then you’ll want to grab a pair of slides. They have a 13/16″ channel to accommodate the 3/4″ thick breadboard.

 

Whatever you choose, make sure to look at what we offer at TheHardwareHut.com. No one should use a breadboard from the 50s. I learned the hard way.

About the author
Johnny Quinn
Johnny Quinn has been at TheHardwareHut.com since 2002 in Customer Service. He and his husband own three properties they rent out as part of their retirement plans. When not in the office you might find him in an airport heading out on some fun adventure. He's been to both Italy and Australia with plans of heading to Peru soon.